Decide with Data: Strategic & Tactical Analysis (Part 1)

Decide with Data

Part 1: Strategic and Tactical Analysis

By Chris Recio, Director of Contact Center and Advanced Applications and Peter Hornberger, Director of Channel Success of BrightMetrics

 

Now for those of you that have been around a ShoreTel PBX and contact center world, you know that reporting is a critical aspect of monitoring and managing your operation.

I will honestly say that big data is not new. It’s been a marketing strategy for the last five years to really talk about big data, but data has been around for eons.

What is missing is, how do we interpret that data and leverage it? For the average user, when you’re managing the contact center at your operation from the employee point of view, the one thing that’s missing is nobody’s really explaining, “How do I get this information, and how do I interpret it for my specific use?”

Data isn’t just straight‑forward. It’s more of a strategic and tactical analysis of that.

I know that a number of you are BrightMetrics customers, have used our platform before. If that’s you, you’re going to learn a lot today about things you can accomplish from within BrightMetrics.

If that’s not you, don’t tune out at this point. Really, these things are somewhat agnostic. If you are not using BrightMetrics or haven’t tapped into our platform, or maybe some of you might have attended this out of interest and you’re not even on the ShoreTel PBX, that’s perfectly fine.

The things that I’m talking about in these concepts and these steps are things that can be applied if you have access to any form of data, whether that’s through an analytics platform like BrightMetrics, or through canned reports in your system, etc.

What we’re talking about today, you saw our topic, “Decide With Data, the Keys to Impacting Customer Experience Now.” Specifically when I say that, what we’re going to talk about is the difference between two types of data analytics that I see used frequently, strategic and tactical analytics.

When you’re deciding with data, you have two different approaches to data that you can take, strategic and tactical.

Almost everyone gets introduced to data analytics because they’re looking to solve for one of these two components. What are those two components?

Well, strategic analytics is typically something that I would define as focusing on long‑term effects. It’s commonly used in upper management. It’s goal oriented. It’s proactive. It answers the question of, “What if…?”

It is something that is looking out over a period of time ‑‑ 30, 60, 90 days, maybe even broader, depending on the amount of data that you have ‑‑ and allowing you to see trends in things like customer satisfaction, user productivity, and staffing level.

Look at that data from a historical standpoint, and see, “Here’s what we the outcomes were over that period of time, but what if we changed this variable going forward? What would happen if we made that adjustment?”

When we say strategic, it’s very much looking at what’s happened and then strategizing about what you can change to affect the outcome going forward. That’s our first type of data. A lot of people, many of you, have probably come to data analytics from that standpoint.

The other kind of data that we’re going to talk about today is tactical analytics. Tactical analytics is something that’s typically used more by supervisors and managers, your call center floor leads.

You see agents engaging with this data set a lot. It’s very reactive, very focused on short‑term impact. It’s results oriented. Where strategic analytics answered a question of, “What if…?” this is more of a question of, “What now?”

Another term for tactical analytics would be real‑time data, looking at what is happening right now.

“Here’s my groups and my queues. I have this many calls sitting in queue. Those calls have been waiting for this amount of time. My target service factor with today is set at this level. My agents are doing this.”

Another way to say this, a more aggressive way to say this, is, “What’s on fire right now?” basically, “Is there a problem, and do I need to react to it instantly?”

There’s always going to be challenging things that crop up for you, and you need to be able to react to those quickly. Tactical analytics is the other side of what we’re talking about here.

As I mentioned, most people come to this from one side or the other. We typically see people jumping into analytics because they need a better real‑time perspective, or because they need to understand their call volume for the last 60, 90 days, something like that.

What I would argue for you today ‑‑ probably the most important thing that I’m going to try to get across to you today ‑‑ is the fact that you need both. You need both the strategic, historical perspective and the tactical views to be a successful contact center.

This is the first of a 3-part series of blog posts about Deciding with Data. In this series, we will talk about the analysis and situational applications of strategic and tactical data analysis. Be sure to check back for parts 2 and 3 in the coming weeks.

THE CONTACT CENTER OF THE FUTURE IS HERE NOW

The Contact Center of the future is here now. Those that take this to heart will be far ahead of those that do not. The gap between these two groups will become wider as proactive operations outpace reactive operations.

As businesses review their year and prepare for 2018, it is very important to mitigate what’s ahead. We spend a great deal of time working with clients at deeper levels in their contact center operation through our CCSM (Contact Center Success Manager) program and found that their struggles boil down to the 5 issues to be pointed and discussed in this series. Stay tuned in the upcoming weeks!

Contact Center operation involves more than software and technology.

For more information about our CCSM Program and to see our latest Support plan options – including what business-enhancing applications and services are covered under our support options, visit our website.

About Inflow

Founded in 1997, Inflow Communications is a national leader in unified communications and Contact Centers. With over to 100,000 endpoints under Inflow’s innovative support plans around the world, their dedication to knowledge, innovation, and unrivaled customer support has landed them in ShoreTel’s top 2% in global customer satisfaction, and as a winner of ShoreTel’s coveted Circle of Excellence Partners award. For two years in a row, Inflow is a ShoreTel Platinum Partner, the highest level of partnership, and is their fastest growing partner globally. In addition, Inflow is one of the few Cloud Contact Center providers that offer implementation, ongoing support, and comprehensive consulting and training programs.  Inflow services clients across the globe and has local offices in over 10 major cities in the US.

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